College

Literature, Communication & Media

THE PROGRAM

The Literature, Communication and Media department prepares its majors to become articulate, analytical, creative, and collaborative communicators. Stressing critical analysis, creative expression, and social awareness, courses across the three fields of Literature, Communication, and Media enable students to develop strong written, oral, and digital communication skills through in-depth engagement with artistic and academic texts, contemporary media technologies, and experiential, applied learning. The program integrates intellectual growth with practical skills that apply to a wide range of professional fields.

Whether entering the work force or earning advanced degrees, LCM graduates are well prepared. Alumni have pursued successful careers in media production and management; marketing; the arts; information management; business, non-profit, and public administration; law; consulting; education; human resources; and the rabbinate. Students have excelled in graduate programs at the University of Southern California (including its prestigious Annenberg School of Communications), the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Michigan Law School, the London School of Economics, and various universities in the California State system.

LCM courses focus on three core areas:

  • Courses focused on The Arts and Society develop students' critical reading and analytical skills while deepening their understanding of political and cultural issues in the United States and around the globe.
  • Media Studies courses engage students in the historical and critical analysis of the media and its impact on our daily lives.
  • Communication and Experiential Studies courses involve the practical application of communication theories and technologies within real-world situations, allowing students to produce creative work in and beyond the classroom.

 

THE MAJOR

LCM students must complete a total of 36 credits within the major.
    The following prerequisites are required:
  • LCM 100 - Introduction to Narrative Art
  • LCM 130 - Introduction to Media Studies
  • LCM 160 - Introduction to Digital Media Applications
    Majors must also complete:
  • two courses in each of the three core areas
  • LCM 400: Advanced Seminar
  • two elective LCM courses at the 300 or 400 level

In special cases, students may work with a professor to design an Independent Study course focused on a topic not otherwise addressed within the curriculum.

Qualified students may apply to the Department Chair for off-campus internships designed to help them develop skills and professional interests related to the major.

THE MINOR

Majors from other academic departments may earn a LCM minor by completing 18 credit hours of LCM coursework.

PREREQUISITES

All students may enroll in any 200 level LCM course so long as they have received credit for the LCM prerequisite associated with the course’s rubric (i.e. The Arts and Society, Media Studies, and Experiential Communication Studies).

All students may enroll in any 300 or 400 level LCM course (except LCM 400: Advanced Seminar, LCM 480: Independent Study, LCM 490: Honors Thesis, and LCM 498: Internship) so long as they have received credit for a 200 level LCM course within the corresponding rubric (and completed any course specific prerequisites).

Only students with Junior and Senior standing who have completed 12 LCM credit hours may register for LCM 400: Advanced Seminar and LCM 498: Internship.

Only students with Senior standing who have completed 15 LCM credit hours may register for LCM 480: Independent Study.

    In order to register for LCM 490: Honors Thesis, students must:
  • have Senior standing
  • have completed 24 LCM credit hours
  • have a GPA of 3.6 or higher in their LCM coursework
  • have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher

Any student may be exempted from the above requirements with the consent of the course instructor and the LCM Department Chair.

LCM COURSES

All courses are worth three credits unless otherwise indicated.

Prerequisites

LCM 100 - Introduction to Narrative Art
Examines how stories are constructed and analyzed by drawing on a range of narrative forms, such as children’s literature, folk tales, poetry, short stories, novels, plays, television, cinema, and journalism. Includes an experiential component in which students write their own narratives.

LCM 130 - Introduction to Media Studies
Provides an introduction to the analysis of telecommunications, mass media, and digitally networked media. Students explore the history of various media technologies while engaging a range of theoretical perspectives on the role of media in society. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of critical media literacy, which involves an awareness of how the media can influence social relations, as well as one’s own self-image.

LCM 160 - Introduction to Digital Media Applications
Provides an introduction to the application of digital media technologies. Students identify and develop a narrative of particular meaning to them, then present it in varying forms (such as written text, recorded audio, photography, and video) making use of digital media in live presentations and on networked platforms.

The Arts and Society

LCM 200 - American Life and Culture
Examines major issues in North American life and culture, from before the European settlement to the present, through an exploration of texts drawn from a variety of literary genres and media formats, including poetry, essays, short stories, novels, plays, television, and cinema.

LCM 201 - The Western Tradition
Examines major issues in European life and culture, from antiquity to the present, through an exploration of texts drawn from a variety of literary genres and media formats, including poetry, essays, short stories, novels, plays, television, and cinema.

LCM 202 - Contemporary Global Perspectives
Examines major contemporary global issues, with a particular focus on the life and culture of peoples in the Global South, through an exploration of texts drawn from a variety of literary genres and media formats, including poetry, essays, short stories, novels, plays, television, and cinema.

LCM 300 - Cinema Theory
Allows students to explore a range of theoretical perspectives on the role of cinema in Western culture, with a primary focus on the interpretation of filmic texts in relation to the social context of their production and reception. (Includes a film screening session in addition to classroom sessions.)

LCM 320 - Special Topics in The Arts and Society
Allows for the focused examination of thematic and/or timely issues related to the arts and society.

Media Studies

LCM 230 - The Business of Media
Examines the economics of the media industry, including its role within the macro-economy, as well as business models and strategies employed by contemporary firms in sectors such as film and television, journalism, and telecommunications. Particularly emphasizes the effects of networked digital technologies.

LCM 240 - Popular Culture: Los Angeles as Laboratory
Examines the production and consumption of popular culture, with particular emphasis on visual culture and images, by using Los Angeles as a living laboratory. Focuses on theories and methodologies that enable a critical analysis of the cultural life of the city and its relevance to institutional authority and the global economy.

LCM 250 - Global Media
Examines key issues in the production, distribution, and consumption of media texts from a global perspective. Focuses on the relationship of cultural identity to various manifestations of political and economic power in both transnational and comparative contexts.

LCM 330 - Media and Democracy
Examines the relationship between the media and democratic governance through the application of historical and critical frameworks.

LCM 350 - Special Topics in Media Studies
Allows for the focused examination of thematic and/or timely issues in the field of media studies.

Experiential Communication Studies

LCM 260 - Collaboration and Presentation
Enables students to work in teams on the research, analysis, and presentation of major cultural or political issues that concern them. Focuses on oral communication in conjunction with the use of digital media for the persuasive presentation of well crafted arguments.

LCM 270 - Creative Writing
Examines the basic elements of creative writing in relation to one or more formats, such as poetry, short fiction, drama, screenwriting, or feature journalism. Students will read and analyze exemplary texts in addition to producing their own work. (May be repeated for credit, though it cannot count for the major more than once.)

LCM 280 - Introduction to Video
Provides an introduction to digital video technologies, as well as basic procedures for both individual and collaborative production. Students will learn to compose shots, record audio, edit sequences, and distribute finished pieces. Focuses primarily on nonfictional narrative.

LCM 360 - Advocacy and Social Media
Provides an introduction to communication strategies related to social justice as well as brand advocacy, with a particular focus on the role of digital networked media. Students design a social media campaign around an advocacy issue of their choice.

LCM 380 - Special Topics in Experiential Communication Studies
Allows for focused engagement with particular creative modes and/or technologies in order to provide students with experiential learning opportunities in relation to communication studies.

Advanced Studies

LCM 400 - Advanced Seminar
Enables thorough and critical analysis of a narrowly focused and complex issue. Designed for upper division students to produce advanced research papers and present their results.

LCM 480 - Independent Study (1 - 3 credits)
Enables students to develop and follow a course of study related to a topic that is not otherwise addressed within the curriculum. (Requires approval of the Department Chair.)

LCM 498 - Internship (1 - 6 credits)
Enables students to complete a professional internship related to the LCM major. (Requires approval of the Department Chair and must adhere to AJU internship policies.)

DEPARTMENT CHAIR & ADVISOR

Richard Potter, Ph.D.
Phone // 310.476.9777 x269
Email // rpotter@aju.edu

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